Tag Archives: Cardiovascular

New York trans fat ban linked to decline in heart attacks, strokes

a nutrition information label with a magnifying glass highlighting the fat content, including Trans Fat 0 gA new study has revealed lower rates of heart attack and stroke in New York communities where trans fats are restricted in restaurant foods.

“This is particularly important now, as the FDA is requiring that virtually all trans fats be phased out of the U.S. food supply,” says Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, who was not involved in the study. “If these results are replicated in the U.S. population, it will result in many fewer Americans experiencing a heart attack or possibly a stroke.”

Yale researchers compared data from New York counties with and without restrictions on trans fats, also known as trans fatty acids, from 2002 to 2013. Study authors reported a 6 percent greater decline in hospital admissions for heart attack and stroke among people living in counties with trans fat restrictions versus those without.

“There are alternatives to trans fats,” says Dr. Hensrud. “These counties in New York have demonstrated it is possible to implement industry changes that produce better health outcomes.”

New York City was the first large city in the U.S. to restrict trans fats in eateries. Several New York counties followed with similar bans. The FDA plans nationwide restrictions on trans fats in 2018.

Most trans fats are made from oils through a food processing method called partial hydrogenation. The resulting product prolongs the shelf life of foods.

According to The Mayo Clinic Diet book, trans fats are in hardened vegetable fats and foods made from them, including many crackers, cookies, cakes, pies and other baked goods, as well as many candies, snack foods and french fries.

Trans fats increase bad (LDL) cholesterol, lower good (HDL) cholesterol, affect the lining of the arteries adversely and increase inflammation in the body.  These risks have been linked to increased cardiovascular disease and higher overall mortality.

“There are no health benefits, and there are documented risks with trans fats,” explains Dr. Hensrud. “The fewer trans fats we consume, the better for our health.”

Read more about trans fats.

Mayo Clinic Minute: Heart matters for millennials

young African-American man in gym for exercise - diversity men's healthRisks for heart disease, such as obesity, lack of exercise, drinking too much alcohol and smoking, are the same for everyone. But Dr. Regis Fernandes, Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says such behaviors seem to be more prevalent in younger people now than in the past.

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Ian Roth talks with Dr. Fernandes about the other big reason millennials may be at a higher risk for developing heart disease at a younger age than previous generations.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:59) is in the downloads. Read the script.

Mayo Clinic Minute: Why skinny doesn’t always mean heart-healthy

young thin woman with chest pain heart attackTrue or false: People of average or below-average weight are not at risk for heart disease.

In the latest Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, 4 of 5 adults recognized that is a false statement.

“People can be skinny but still fat in the inside,” says Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez. “Anywhere from 15 to 30 percent of people with normal weight might actually have a lot of fat.”

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Dr. Lopez-Jimenez explains a condition called normal-weight obesity that puts a thin-looking person at risk for the same health problems faced by someone who is obese. Jeff Olsen reports.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:59) is in the downloads. Read the script.  

Mayo Clinic Minute: Are you hitting your target heart rate?

Running on a treadmillExercising at the proper intensity can boost the cardiovascular benefit of your workouts, but a new Mayo Clinic survey shows most people don’t know if they’re reaching the mark.

The latest Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup revealed only 2 in 5 Americans (42 percent) are aware of what’s called the target heart rate ─ a point at which your heart is being exercised and conditioned but not overworked.

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Nicole Burow, a health and wellness coach at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Center, explains how you can find and monitor your target heart rate. Jeff Olsen reports.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:58) is in the downloads. Read the script.

Mayo Clinic Minute: Ideas for a heart-healthy diet

heart-shaped bowls of various healthy foodsHow’s your heart? What are you doing to make it healthier? A new Mayo Clinic survey shows a family history of heart disease is a big factor in how you answer those questions.

In the latest Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, 67 percent of participants with a family history of heart disease listed dietary changes as the main way they are working to improve heart health, followed by monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol regularly (59 percent) and increasing exercise (51 percent).

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, cardiologist Dr. Rekha Mankad has ideas for dietary changes you can make today to boost your heart health. Jeff Olsen reports.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:58) is in the downloads. Read the script