Tag Archives: News Releases

Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup shows African-Americans significantly more concerned about heart health

African American woman stretching before exercise

ROCHESTER, Minn. – A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent).

These findings were uncovered as part of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, which first launched in January 2016 and provides a quick pulse on consumer health opinions and behaviors at multiple times throughout the year.

“The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup helps us to better understand the health knowledge and practices of all Americans, beyond the patients that walk through our doors,” says John Wald, M.D., medical director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic. “With each survey, we’re able to pinpoint what we’re doing well as a nation and what needs improvement, so that we can create a dialogue about those important topics.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelly Reller, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

Search engines help consumers learn more, manage health conditions

While many people joke around about “Dr. Google,” survey respondents confirmed that Americans find general search engines to be the most helpful tool in learning more about health conditions (71 percent) and proactively managing their health (62 percent).

When it comes to knowledge of heart health, doctors (81 percent) were cited as having the biggest influence on consumer knowledge, followed by family members (63 percent). The most likely reasons to think about heart health include:

  • A family member or friend being diagnosed with heart disease (84 percent)
  • Visiting a primary care physician (80 percent)
  • Conversations with a significant other or children (69 percent)

1 in 4 has family history of heart disease before age 55

Nearly a quarter of respondents (24 percent) cited a family history of heart disease (i.e., heart attack, bypass surgery or stents before 55). This history impacted knowledge and behaviors for many respondents:

  • Eighty-five percent answered that they were more aware of the symptoms of a heart attack because of their family history.
  • Top lifestyle modifications due to family history of heart disease included making dietary changes (67 percent), monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol regularly (59 percent), and increasing exercise (51 percent).
  • Among baby boomers, 53 percent of those with a family history of heart disease answered that they took a daily aspirin, and the same percentage kept an aspirin with them at all times.

When asked what they do to help prevent heart disease, men (68 percent) were more likely than women (60 percent) to say that they exercise regularly, and women (68 percent) were more likely than men (58 percent) to answer that they eat heart-healthy foods.

“Knowledge is power,” says Dr. Wald. “You can manage your risk for heart disease by taking proactive steps, such as improving your diet, exercising regularly, and keeping a check on your cholesterol and blood pressure. To top it off, Mayo Clinic now offers a blood test that can predict the likelihood of having a heart attack within one year, which helps us intervene early and prevent a heart attack before it happens.”

Click to see the entire National Health Checkup infographic.

Women exercise for weight loss; men exercise for recreation

The survey also explored healthy behaviors, such as exercise, revealing that men and women have different motivators. Women (70 percent) are more likely than men (60 percent) to exercise for weight loss or management; whereas, men (59 percent) are more likely than women (45 percent) to exercise for recreation. Less than half of respondents answered that they knew what their target heart rate should be during exercise. Maintaining a target heart rate can reduce the risk of overtraining or not training enough.

Job and/or school ranks as top stressor for Americans

Unrelieved stress can damage your arteries and worsen other risk factors for heart disease. When asked to pick the one factor that contributed the most to their level of stress over the past year, respondents were most likely to answer their job and/or school (29 percent):

  • Baby boomers (17 percent) were more likely than millennials (10 percent) to cite politics as a top stressor.
  • Hispanic respondents (41 percent) were more likely to answer job and/or school than Caucasians (27 percent) or African-Americans (18 percent).
  • African-American respondents (20 percent) were more likely to list health issues as their primary cause of stress than Caucasians (10 percent) or Hispanics (4 percent).

“Our third National Health Checkup revealed that African-Americans not only are more concerned about their heart health, but they also experience significantly more stress as a result of their health issues,” says Dr. Wald. “It is clear that we need to help empower all Americans, and in particular those who are most concerned about their heart health, to help manage their risk. Discuss these concerns with your doctor, and know your family history.”

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About the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup
The Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup was conducted through an ORC International Telephone CARAVAN survey of 1,005 adults living in the continental U.S. and was conducted Dec. 15-18, 2016. To learn more, visit healthcheckup.mayoclinic.org.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Mayo Clinic Diet named Best Commercial Diet by U.S. News & World Report

Mayo Clinic Diet Book Second EditionROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Diet has been named No. 1 in the Best Commercial Diet category in U.S. News & World Report’s 2017 Best Diets rankings. The Mayo approach offers a weight-loss and lifestyle program based on years of research and clinical experience.

“We are honored to be recognized for a weight-loss method that offers lasting results,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “With two-thirds of Americans overweight or obese, we know that managing a healthy weight can be challenging, but when people see results quickly, they feel empowered to continue on their journey to a healthier weight.”

With the arrival of the new year, many people may vow to adopt a healthier lifestyle, including weight loss. Mayo Clinic experts recognize that dieting in the traditional sense may not lead to lasting results. The Mayo Clinic Diet offers advice on starting a weight-loss journey and staying on track. The diet offers effective, practical, healthy and enjoyable methods to lose unwanted pounds and keep them off for good.

“The Mayo Clinic Diet is much more than a diet,” Dr. Hensrud says. “It’s a lifestyle program in which people can eat great-tasting food and feel better right away ─ even while they lose weight. More importantly, these lifestyle changes are sustainable and can improve long-term health as people reach and maintain a healthy weight.”

The Mayo Clinic Diet is designed to help people manage weight long term. The easy-to-follow, two-phase plan offers practical and flexible approaches to shedding pounds and keeping them off. The Mayo Clinic Diet begins with a Quick Start plan. The Lose It! phase is designed to help dieters lose 6 to 10 pounds in the first two weeks by adding five habits, breaking five habits and adopting five bonus habits. The second step is the Live It! Phase, which turns those new habits into a lifestyle. This phase is designed to help dieters continue to lose 1 to 2 pounds each week until they reach their desired healthy weight and sustain it.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected].

The diet isn’t restrictive or confusing. There is no calorie counting, or excluded foods or groups of food. The dietary plan is built around health-supporting vegetables and fruits; lean proteins; whole grains; and healthy fats, such as nuts and olive oil. The diet focuses on generous amounts of vegetables and fruits and healthy choices in other food groups. Portions of higher-calorie foods are limited but not excluded. Physical activity of at least 30 minutes most days also is emphasized to highlight overall health and weight.

“Managing weight does not have to be a negative experience,” Dr. Hensrud says. “When approached in the right way, achieving a healthy weight, feeling better and having an enjoyable lifestyle can go hand in hand.”

Video of Dr. Hensrud highlighting the newly published second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet, is available on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

Mayo Clinic publishes second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet to help people shed weight, stay trim

Mayo Clinic Diet Book Second EditionROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will publish the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet with all-new menu plans and recipes on Jan. 1. The book offers effective methods to adopt simple, enjoyable, practical, safe and healthy behaviors to lose unwanted pounds and, most importantly — keep them off for good. The Mayo approach is based on years of research and clinical experience.

“We created the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet for two reasons,” says Donald Hensrud, M.D., medical editor of The Mayo Clinic Diet and the director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program. “First, we want to keep up with and include new research and information to help people better manage their weight. Second, we wanted to respond to readers’ requests for new helpful features.”

The Mayo Clinic Diet is designed as a lifestyle program ― not a traditional diet. With two easy-to-follow phases, it offers practical and flexible approaches to shedding pounds and keeping them off. The new edition offers:

  • New recipes.
  • Four weeks of new meal plans designed by Mayo Clinic’s weight management and nutrition experts.
  • New tables that help people create salads and entrees tailored to their tastes.
  • Tips for overcoming common weight management challenges.
  • Help in starting an exercise plan.
  • Overall encouragement for success.

The diet is simple by design to help people start and continue to manage weight long term.

The Mayo Clinic Diet begins with a Quick Start plan. The Lose It! phase is designed to help dieters lose 6 to 10 pounds in the first two weeks.

“We know people want to lose weight and lose it quickly, so, by changing habits suddenly, they start to see results and feel empowered to continue on their journey to a healthier weight,” Dr. Hensrud says.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The Lose It! phase includes adding five habits, breaking five habits and adopting five bonus habits.

The second step is the Live It! Phase, to turn those new habits into a lifestyle. This phase is designed to help dieters continue to lose 1 to 2 pounds each week until they reach their desired healthy weight and sustain it.

Live It! offers a customized guide to the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid and Mayo Clinic Healthy Dining Table. The Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid is based on the concept that eating generous amounts of plant foods, such as vegetables and fruits, will lead to better weight management and improved health. The Mayo Clinic Healthy Dining Table shows the portions of different food groups to include in a healthy diet.

To help dieters track their goals and succeed with weight loss, The Mayo Clinic Diet Journal is available as a companion to The Mayo Clinic Diet. Like the diet, the journal includes a Lose It! quick-start section to monitor habits and a Live It! section to record daily eating and exercise.

“The fact that two-thirds of all Americans are overweight or obese shows how challenging weight management is,” Dr. Hensrud says. “We all have our own challenges, but it’s not impossible to overcome them.”

The Mayo Clinic Diet ($27.99 U.S./hardcover) and The Mayo Clinic Diet Journal ($16.99 U.S./plastic comb binding) ― both published by Mayo Clinic ― will be available Jan. 1. Find more information about The Mayo Clinic Diet at http://diet.mayoclinic.org/diet/home. Proceeds from the book will support medical education and research at Mayo Clinic.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

‘OB Nest’: A Novel Approach to Prenatal Care

a group of pregnant women in a birthing class

ROCHESTER, Minn. — “OB Nest”: Just the name may bring warm feelings to parents and prospective parents. However, at Mayo Clinic, it’s much more than a name. It’s a new way that Mayo Clinic is providing prenatal care. And, families say they are thrilled with the process.

Current prenatal care for a pregnancy consists of 12-14 visits with an obstetrician. However, often these visits are just brief check-ins to make sure a pregnancy is progressing well. Previous research has looked at ways to give providers more time for high-risk patients, and save time and office visits for women with low-risk pregnancies. While these studies have shown that less visits are safe, patients reported less satisfaction overall.

Seeking to identify ways to improve patient experience and perceived value, Mayo Clinic researchers decided to test a new way of providing prenatal care, dubbed “OB Nest.”

a little baby in a chicken costume sitting in an egg nest

MEDIA CONTACT:  Elizabeth Zimmermann Young, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

With the changes to the care experience provided within OB Nest, the researchers found that not only did patient satisfaction improve, but also this improved satisfaction came with fewer office visits. They will present their findings in an oral presentation during the 2016 Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), May 14-17, 2016.

“Traditionally, pregnancy is treated as a sickness,” says Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D., a Mayo Clinic obstetrician and lead author of this study. “We wanted our care to reflect the normal, life-bringing event that it is, and [we] looked for a way to transform prenatal care into a wellness, patient-oriented experience.”

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in collaboration with the Center for Innovation, worked with patients and staff to collect and prioritize ideas to improve the way pregnant women and their families experience prenatal care. Along with the department, the Care Experience Program, which is part of the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, took this information and these ideas and designed evidence-based practice improvements for prenatal care.

OB Nest study participants – all of whom were experiencing low-risk pregnancies – entered the program with a specific nurse identified as their lead contact. They received eight scheduled office visits (More were optional.) and home monitoring equipment for fetal heart rate and maternal blood pressure. In addition, they could take part in an online care community with other OB Nest participants and nurses from the OB Nest care team.

“My schedule is very hectic,” says Seri Carney, M.D., a mom who participated in the OB Nest study during pregnancy with her second child. “It was really nice to only have to go in for my appointments every other month. My husband and I didn’t have to worry as often about arranging our work schedules for the appointments.”

“We could listen to the heartbeat whenever we wanted,” says Dr. Carney. “Our daughter was 4 at the time, and doing it at home meant that she could get involved, too. That was really fun. It also felt like it made me more aware of the movements and heartbeat of my baby.”

In her third trimester, when Dr. Carney noticed her baby’s heartbeat was a little low, she was able to email her care team. They reacted right away and got Carney in for a stress test. All was fine, and within a few weeks, she and her family welcomed baby Luisa Jane.

The OB Nest research project is part of Mayo Clinic’s health care delivery research efforts, and aligns with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim.

“This fulfills the holy grail of what patients expect today,” says Abimbola Famuyide, M.B.B.S., chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and study principal investigator. “How can we continue to improve patient experience and clinical outcomes, while, at the same time, keep costs down?”

“Improving the patient experience, in the case of OB Nest, includes empowering expectant women to truly engage in, and take control of, their care,” says Dr. Famuyide. He and his team learned that having one nurse as the center point for each woman’s care and concerns provided them the comfort of easy connection. Concurrently, fewer office visits saved health care provider resources, while reducing patient burden.

This practice transforming research is leading to permanent changes in the way women receive prenatal care across Mayo Clinic. It is part of the goal of the Mayo Model of Community Care, to deliver wellness-focused, high-value health care – improving access, convenience and patient satisfaction, while lowering costs.

The OB Nest research team is led by:

  • Dr. Famuyide, principal investigator
  • Annie LeBlanc, Ph.D., co-principal investigator

Co-investigators are:

  • Bobbie Gostout, M.D.
  • Roger Harms, M.D.
  • Dr. Butler Tobah
  • Ellen Brodrick, A.P.R.N., C.N.M.
  • Vanessa Torbenson, M.D.
  • Susan Sobolewski, R.N.
  • Anne Baron, R.N.
  • Misty Baker, R.N.
  • Angela Sivly, C.C.R.P.
  • Nancy Jo Knutson, R.N.
  • Katie Slifko, M.S.N., R.N.
  • Maureen Lemens, R.N.
  • Susan Stirn, M.S.N., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C.
  • Jennifer Ridgeway
  • Jonathan Inselman
  • Megan Branda
  • Megan Morris, Ph.D.
  • Dawn Finnie
  • Katharine Nesbitt

ACOG awarded the researchers  second prize in the scientific program for 2016. In addition to the presentation at ACOG, the team is presenting two posters at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28.

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About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.