Tag Archives: produce

Hydrating Foods

Most people could do a better job of staying hydrated. Counting glasses of H2O is important, but so are the foods you eat. Here’s the lowdown on some in-season foods to perk up your hydration.

Assess Your Hydration
The best way to tell if you’re getting enough fluids is to pay attention to your body. Urination should be frequent and light yellow to clear in color. The more fluid you lose in sweat, the more you should replace. Aim to take in half your body weight in fluid ounces as a baseline – that’s 75 fluid ounces for a 150-pound person. If you exercise, drink more — especially when working out in the heat and humidity.

Fluid-Boosting Foods
In addition to drinking plenty of water, reach for these seasonal foods to help stay hydrated this summer.

Lettuce
Iceberg is low in calories and has one of the highest water contents of any food. Other leafy varieties like romaine and green leaf are also good options.

Get more from: salads and lettuce cups

Watermelon
You can feel the hydration pouring from this melon; it also contains plenty of the antioxidant lycopene.

Get more from: smoothies, salads and frozen treats

Cucumbers
Nothing says cool and refreshing like a fresh cuke! Keep the peel on for extra nutrients and flavor.

Get more from: snacking on raw veggies, infused water and salsa

Tomatoes
It’s the very best time of year for juicy tomatoes, which are rich in vitamins A and C, fiber and potassium.

Get more from: pizza, salsa and gazpacho

Cauliflower
It may be surprising, but there’s a hefty dose of water in this cruciferous veggie; it also has potential cancer-fighting properties.

Get more from: cauliflower rice, or a new take on tabbouleh

Fresh herbs
Leafy fresh herbs like basil, parsley and mint have a remarkably high moisture content — use them often in a wide variety of recipes to reap their nutritional benefits.

Get more from: salads, pressed juices and pesto

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition.

What’s in This Week’s CSA Box?

We in the Food Network Kitchen got our first box of CSA (community supported agriculture) produce from Mountain View Farm in Easthampton, MA. And probably like many of you at home, unpacking the box had us wondering, “What are we going to do with all this stuff?”

CSAs aren’t exactly a new idea. After all, farmers selling directly to the consumer is the original business model. But the locavore trend is one way to buck the industrial agricultural system (or skip the hassle of the produce aisle), with members buying “shares” in a farm’s annual harvest.

This is the most-exciting box of produce you will ever receive — your own mystery basket to keep you on your culinary toes week after week. So sign up, get to know your local farmer and keep reading to find out how to use even the most alien-looking produce in the box. We’ll give a glimpse at our CSA box and share tips on how to use the produce every other week throughout the summer and fall.

Bok Choy
Bok choy is a mild-flavored member of the cabbage family you’ve probably enjoyed at your local Chinese restaurant. Whether steamed, stir-fried or tossed in a saute pan with minced garlic and oil, it is a delicious dinner table addition.

Fennel
You might not know it from looking at this vegetable, but it comes from the same family as carrots. Slice your fennel bulb for adding crunch to salads, roasting for a side dish, or steaming and serving with fresh dill.

Garlic Scapes
Green curlicue garlic scapes are mild, almost sweet in flavor, with a garlicky aftertaste. Chop and saute them with vegetables, add them to your morning frittata, or enjoy them raw in salads or as garnish for crunch.

Hakurei Turnips
The leaves of this Japanese turnip are bitter and benefit from cooking, while the roots are small, delicate and tender. Enjoy the whole turnip from root to leaf.

Head Lettuce
Head or iceberg lettuce has gotten a bad rap for being tasteless and lacking the healthy folates of darker, leafier greens, but its crispiness and mild taste make it the perfect lettuce base for chopped and wedge salads.

Kohlrabi
Think of kohlrabi — the strangest-looking vegetable in the bunch — as a mild-flavored cabbage. Roast it, mash it, saute the greens or eat it raw; you’ll wonder how you got along without it.

Radishes
Your standard radish comes in a variety of colors, has a peppery taste, and is delicious raw or roasted. Don’t waste your radish greens, which can also be eaten, lightly sauteed, or pulverized into soup or pesto.

Scallions
Scallions are an easygoing onion. Milder than mature onions, scallions can be enjoyed raw or cooked when you want just a hint of pungent onion flavor.

Spinach
No doubt you’re familiar with this dark green, force-fed to children around the world. As adults we can appreciate that the versatile, tender leaves are perfect for bulking up salads, and they’re great steamed or sauteed for a simple side dish.

Strawberries
There are a million uses for this sweet, summer berry. Enjoy strawberries raw, bake them into pies, make them into jam, and even toss them into savory green or whole-grain salads.

Summer Squash
Summer squash has thinner skin than winter varietals, meaning it cooks faster. Try different squashes, including the scalloped pattypan squash and green zucchini, in a summer stir-fry or shaved into raw “noodles.” Look for more glimpses into our CSA boxes throughout the summer.

The Summer Meal Plan 2016 (sneak peek + full recipe list)

So, it’s Summer. Ahh. YES. The season of BBQ’s, patio nights under the string lights, boating, traveling, camping, sunsets, grilling, …continue reading >

The post The Summer Meal Plan 2016 (sneak peek + full recipe list) appeared first on Simply Real Health.

Farmers’ Market Finds: Scapes and Rabes, Beyond Broccoli and Garlic

If you haunt your farmers market looking for signs of spring, you’re probably familiar with garlic scapes and broccoli rabe…they’re some of the first greens you’ll find. But scapes and rabe come in more varieties than garlic and broccoli. Here’s the skinny on what they are and what other varieties to look for.

 

What Are Scapes?

These shoots are one of the first edible greens to crop up in spring. Scapes are simply flower stalks that grow out of the bulbs of garlic, onions and leeks. At the top of each is a bulb that will flower if left unplucked. For eating, though, scapes are picked when the green stalk is sturdy and the bulb is still a bulb. Scapes taste like the alliums they grow from, and you can use them in places you would use chopped onion.

 

How to Use Scapes

To cook scapes, remove the bulbs and use the stalks. Chop them finely and saute to soften. Add them to omelets or quiche, blitz them into a pesto or preserve them by pickling.

What Is Rabe?

Like scapes, rabe (also referred to as raab or rapini) is the outgrowth of more recognizable plants. Most greens, left to grow wild, will sprout and flower, turning into rabe. At the end of a harvest season, if plants like kale, broccoli, mustard and collard greens are left in the field, they’ll go to seed and sprout, even forming yellow flowers. That entire plant (including the leaves and flowers) is edible.

 

How to Cook Rabe

One of the easiest and best ways to cook any kind of rabe is to blanch it and then saute it in olive oil and garlic.

 

Kerri-Ann Jenning is a registered dietitian who writes on food and health trends. Find more of her work at kerriannjennings.com or follow her on Twitter @kerriannrd or Facebook.

Link About It: A Family Growing 6,000 lbs of Produce Annually at Home

A Family Growing 6,000 lbs of Produce Annually at Home


A California family grows up to 6,000 lbs of produce each year in just their back yard—a space that’s one-tenth of an acre. The Dervaes family, who call their mini-farm the “Urban Homestead,” started it 30 years ago as a means to reconnect with their……

Continue Reading…