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Protein Powder

4 Myths About Protein Powder

Protein powder is certainly a powerful nutritional supplement. Protein powder allows athletes to quickly ingest high-quality protein that helps rebuild muscles and maintain fitness levels, and is valuable as a supplement to a healthy, balanced diet.

However, there are quite a few myths surrounding protein powder. In this article, Devel Fitness will take a look at 4 of these common myths, and explain what’s fact – and what’s fiction. Read on, and boost your nutrition IQ!

  1. You Have To Consume Protein Powder Right After Working Out

You’ve probably seen people pounding protein shakes in the gym locker room, in order to “maximize” the effect of their protein powder, and help them recover more quickly. Many people say that you must consume a protein shake within 30-60 minutes of your workout for it to have any effect on your recovery.

This is not true. A small amount of protein after a workout can certainly be helpful, but there’s no magical benefit to consuming a large amount of protein within that 30-60 minute window.

As long as you’re getting enough protein every day, it doesn’t really matter when you consume it. It’s as simple as that.

  1. Protein Powder Is Better Than Protein Available In Food

You’ll hear a lot of boasts from protein powder manufacturers about how great their protein powder is – and how it’s more “bioavailable” or “high-quality” than food-based protein. But this is nothing more than a marketing technique.

Protein is protein – and all protein powders are derived from natural food. Whether it’s a whey-based protein, soy-based protein, or any other kind of protein powder. Whether it’s from nuts, fish, red meat, dairy, or any other source, there is no such thing as a “better” protein.

Protein powder is only “better” than food-based protein for a single reason – it’s convenient. If you typically have trouble eating enough protein, a protein shake can be a valuable way to quickly supplement your intake, and ensure your diet is balanced.

  1. Protein Shakes Are Good For Losing Weight

This depends on the protein shake. A whey protein powder with no added sugars or carbohydrates may be used as a meal replacement, or to satisfy daily cravings while you’re losing weight – but they won’t magically make you more slim.

In addition, care should be taken when selecting a protein powder. Protein powders labeled as “mass gainers” for example, can often contain enormous amounts of junk calories in the form of simple sugars – because these products are actually designed to help athletes gain weight.

So take care when selecting a protein powder, and choose one that includes no additional carbohydrates or additives.

  1. Excessive Protein Consumption Hurts Your Kidneys

This myth is totally untrue for healthy people. If your kidneys are healthy, a high-protein diet will not have a negative effect on your health. In fact, there is some evidence that a high-protein diet can help fight diseases like diabetes – which can have a negative impact on your kidneys!

However, this myth does have a basis in reality. Individuals who are suffering from chronic kidney dysfunction should eat a low-protein diet. This is because damaged kidneys are not able to easily remove protein waste effectively, so it’s wise to minimize total protein intake.

Still, for a healthy individual, consumption of protein powder poses no risk to your kidneys.

Understand The Usefulness – And Limitations – Of Protein Powder!

Hopefully, this article has helped you understand why protein powder can be helpful, and cleared up some of the more common myths and misconceptions surrounding this nutritional supplement.

At Devel Fitness, we’re happy to offer both helpful nutrition and wellness tips, as well as our powerful SuperBand system! Whether you’re just getting started on your health and wellness journey, or you’re an active athlete, you can benefit from our products!

So visit our website to learn more about SuperBands, and to get more nutrition advice, workout tips, and more!

Thanks for reading, and feel free to share your comments and input below!

Trend Alert: Pea Protein

Proteins derived from plants are getting more recognition as many folks strive to have a more plant-based diet. At the forefront of this trend is protein from legumes like peas. Find out if the newfound popularity is worth the hype.

 

Peas As a Protein Source

One cup of raw green peas contains 8 grams of protein. Yellow or green split peas are also often used for pea-based products; this dried version contains 48 grams in the same 1 cup portion. Depending on the product, you might find either of these options added so check ingredient lists for clarification.

The type of protein found in peas is different than animal derived sources. As with most plant-based foods, some amino acids are missing, but peas do contain three important muscle building “branched chain” amino acids, leulcine, isoleucine and valine.

Pea protein powder has become a popular additive in snack foods and bars. Extracting the protein from food to powder does require some processing so the nutrient profile will differ slightly from the whole food version. Pea protein does have an advantage compared to some other popular protein supplements (like whey or casein) as it contains more hunger fighting fiber.

 

Pea Protein Products

There’s been a steep increase in the amount of products containing pea protein. Unflavored protein powders like Bob’s Red Mill and Now Nutrition can be added to smoothies and baked goods. Larabar ALT bars are a vegan snack bar enhanced with pea protein. Harvest Snaps turned peas into a crunchy snack.

Bottom Line: Pea protein offers a valuable vegetarian option for those who need more protein. Eating good ol’ peas to increase protein intake remains the most-nutritious vehicle, but powders and other enhanced foods offer more variety.

 Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition.

What Makes a Good Protein Shake?

Confused about protein shakes? You certainly aren’t alone. It’s tricky to tell what’s healthy to sip and what will lead to a calorie overload. Here’s how to build a healthier shake with all the nutrients your body needs (and nothing it doesn’t) after exercise.

 

Sports Nutrition

The best time to have a protein shake is after a workout, since in the hour immediately following exercise, your body is craving nutrients and fluids to help replenish energy stores and allow worn-out muscles to recover. A beverage can be a perfect delivery system, but that doesn’t mean you can just toss anything into a blender. Your muscles require a balance of carbohydrate and protein, ideally in a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio. In order to achieve this nutrient goal, choose from some of these star ingredients.

 

Fruit: Fresh and frozen fruit add natural sweetness as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants to help fight inflammation after a hard workout.

 

Dairy: Yogurt adds tummy-pleasing probiotics and a creamy texture. Greek yogurt is also high in protein and adds bone-building calcium.

 

Nondairy milks: Experiment with milk alternatives like almond, soy, coconut and rice milk. They feature different flavor profiles, and most are fortified with calcium and vitamin D, another important nutrient for bone and muscle health.

 

Liquid: Every smoothie needs some liquid, and 100% fruit juice can be a good choice, but too much can make a shake overly sugary. Good old water will do the trick, but you can also try plain coconut water for a boost of flavor and a dose of potassium, an important electrolyte.

 

Protein boosts: If you want to boost the protein content, nut butters, silken tofu and protein are good choices. But be sure to combine them with an adequate amount of carbs. When choosing a protein powder, simple is best. Opt for a clean and uncomplicated ingredient list such as that found in EAS 100% Whey Protein or biPro Whey Protein Isolate. If you’re looking for a plant-based option, try powders by Bob’s Red Mill made from soy, hemp or peas.

 

Recipes to Try

All these tasty smoothies feature the proper balance of carbs and protein for optimal recovery.

Papaya Banana Smoothie

Blueberry Blast Smoothie

Citrus Cream Smoothie

Vanilla Bean Coconut Yogurt Smoothie

Peanut Butter and Banana Smoothie

 

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition.