Tag Archives: workouts

cold-weather workouts

Simple Health – Preparing For Cold-Weather Workouts? Follow These Tips!

Summer is in the rearview mirror – but that means that peak training season is just beginning, for many athletes! Working out in the cold weather is easy if you know what you’re doing – so in this article, we’ll take a look at some simple steps you can take to prepare for cold-weather workouts.

Whether it’s 40 degrees and raining, or even below freezing, these tips will keep you safe and comfortable!

  1. Get Warmed Up (Inside!)

The initial shock of going outside to work out when it’s freezing can be mitigated by a solid indoor warm-up session. When you get your muscles warmed up and work up a bit of a sweat, your core body temperature will start to rise – you’ll be your own space heater!

You can choose to jump rope indoors, or even do a basic stretching workout using our Devel Fitness SuperBands! The choice is yours.

  1. Don’t Overdress

Overdressing is common for newer athletes who have not had experience working out in cooler weather. If you’re planning a serious outdoor workout, you should dress as if it’s 10-20°F  (5-10°C) warmer than it is outside.

You’re going to build up a sweat, and if you overdress for the weather, you’re going to be hot and uncomfortable during your workout. Here are a few recommendations:

 

  • 15°C – A t-shirt/long-sleeved shirt and shorts
  • 10°C – A long-sleeved base layer, t-shirt, shorts, gloves

 

  • 5°C – A long-sleeved base layer, a long-sleeved shirt, tights and shorts, gloves

  • 0°C – A long-sleeved base layer, running jacket, tights/track pants, gloves, a hat

These are just “rule-of-thumb” tips. Your own gear needs will depend on your weight, gender, workout plans, and your tolerance for the cold.

  1. Have A Plan To Deal With Sweat – Dress In Layers

You’re going to sweat – even when it’s nearly freezing outside. This can actually be a bad thing. Sweat is extremely effective at cooling our bodies. When it builds up on our skin and evaporates in the cold, it chills us very quickly.

Because of this, you should always wear at least 2 layers if temperatures are approaching (or below) freezing. This helps prevent sweat from evaporating directly off of your skin, and keeps you warmer.

  1. Recognize Cold-Weather Danger Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia are real dangers when exercising in extremely cold, below-freezing temperatures. With the proper gear, they’re easy to avoid – but you should still recognize the danger signs.

Hypothermia usually makes you feel sluggish and clumsy, and may affect your speech, and make you feel confused. Your breathing may also slow down, and your skin may feel “tingly”.

Frostnip and frostbite usually begin with a reddening and numbness or pain in the skin, usually in the extremities such as the fingers, toes, and nose/ears. If you have poor blood circulation, you may be at an increased risk of frostnip/bite.

  1. Know When It’s Just Not Safe To Exercise Outdoors

Even the most seasoned athletes recognize when it’s not safe to exercise in brutal weather conditions. If the wind chill puts temperatures below 0°F (-17°C), exposed skin could be at risk of frostbite developing in as little as 30 minutes to an hour.

And if it’s extremely windy and rainy, you may also want to consider skipping your outdoor workout. Rain will chill you about 25x faster than air – so even in milder conditions, try to avoid working out in the rain.

If conditions outside are unacceptable, just head to your local gym and work out indoors – or grab your set of SuperBands, and get your heart pumping with one of our easy-to-follow workouts!

Stay Warm (And Safe) Out There!

Cold weather doesn’t have to stop you from training. So follow these helpful tips to prepare yourself for working out in chilly conditions – and get ready to take on the ice, snow, and rain!

For more exercise tips, take a look at our blog, or browse our site to learn more about our SuperBands home gym exercise system.

3 Resistance Band Workouts To Do In 15 Minutes Or Less

3 Resistance Band Workouts To Do In 15 Minutes Or Less

Philip Haynes / Getty Images

3 Resistance Band Workouts To Do In 15 Minutes Or Less

If you’re looking for that perfect anywhere, anytime workout, a resistance band is one of the best tools around—they’re insanely versatile and super portable. Toss one in your suitcase for a quickie vacation workout, or just stash one in your closet for when you don’t have time to hit the gym. The best part? For something so simple, there are a surprising number of ways to use it to sculpt, tone, and sweat.

The exercises you can do with a resistance band are pretty much endless, and it can supercharge your favorite bodyweight moves. Not sure where to start? First, snag a band—some have handles, but simpler bands without handles can be even cheaper (and lighter). You can also tie them into a circular band for moves like these butt-sculpting exercises.

Next, try these three total-body workouts—they’ll get your heart pumping and your muscles burning, which means you’ll get a cardio and a strength workout in. And since they’re each 15 minutes or less, there are no excuses. Ready to work?

Related: The 1 Thing That Will Make Every Workout More Effective

1. Four moves, six minutes, full body.

This workout features two upper-body moves and two lower-body moves. For an extra burn, do two sets—or even three!

2. Or try this multitasking 12-minute routine from Tone it Up.

This routine has tons of moves that’ll strengthen two body parts at once (those lunges with curls burn so good). Plus, not a bad outdoor view, huh?

3. This 10-minute workout has an extra focus on cardio.


This workout will get your heart rate up thanks to quick transitions and minimal rest, so it’s great if you’re looking for a little extra cardio boost.

The post 3 Resistance Band Workouts To Do In 15 Minutes Or Less appeared first on SELF.

How Accurate Is Your Fitness Tracker?

Wearable fitness trackers — including Fitbit and Jawbone devices — are wildly popular ways to keep a tally of all the daily activities you do. They count steps and calories, measure heart rate and, in some cases, monitor things like how much and how well you sleep. But before you live and die by those numbers on your device, you might want to consider something: How accurate is all that information anyway?

According to a new study by researchers at Ball State University’s Human Performance Lab, the answer is they are both very accurate and wildly inaccurate — depending on what they’re measuring. When it comes to counting steps, these trackers do a great job, as long as those steps are taken while walking or running. “But they all tended to underestimate the amount of activity subjects got while doing household chores like sweeping, cleaning and doing laundry,” said Alex Montoye, a clinical exercise physiology professor at Ball State University.

The researchers watched subjects perform various activities and used a tally counter to record every single step observed. They also had subjects hooked up to a metabolic analyzer to measure the amount of oxygen used, which relates directly to how many calories are being burned. This data was compared to the steps and calories recorded by the trackers the subjects wore.

And while the number of steps recorded during walking and running were nearly spot-on, the trackers overestimated the number of calories burned during those activities by anywhere from 15 to 40 percent. That’s enough to negate that cookie you thought you earned during your workout.

None of these flaws are reason enough to stop using a fitness tracker, especially because these tools are powerful motivators for many people and do a great job at keeping you accountable to your activity goals on a daily basis. “The takeaway is to be careful not to take the numbers too literally,” cautions Montoye. “The number on your wrist doesn’t matter as much as the fact that you’re being active every day.”

Sally Wadyka is a Boulder, Colorado-based journalist who writes about nutrition, health and wellness.

6 Fitness Tips For Long-Term Success

Everyone wants to get in beach body shape for summer, but how about making changes to get fit and stay fit throughout the year? These six tips will help set you up for long-term success.

Avoid overshooting.

Know your limits, and be practical about how much you can and should exercise. It’s better to start conservatively and progress to more strenuous workouts than to start by overdoing it and risk getting burnt out or injured. If you currently exercise one or two days a week, bump it up to three. Eventually work up to five or six, and always include a day to rest.

Set a goal.

Sign up for a race or competition, map out a new route, or join a class you’ve always wanted to try. Working toward attainable goals will help keep you motivated and dedicated. Decide on a way to reward your accomplishments that’s not food-related, and then work toward a new goal.

Asses hydration.

According to a new study released by the , many Americans actually are drinking enough water — but are you one of them? The report also found that as physical activity increased, so did water intake. But because folks who exercise regularly are at greater risk for falling short on fluids, it’s worth counting up the ounces you drink for a couple of days to see where you stand.

Eat for performance.

Keeping fit means eating right. Fuel your workouts by eating properly beforehand and making smart choices during the rest of the day. It’s fine to indulge occasionally, but try not to undo all that hard work by eating too many high-calorie foods.

Remember to recover, recover, recover.

This buzzy sports nutrition term actually means something. Get in a meal or snack of some healthy carbs and protein directly after exercise to help replenish energy stores and build muscle. Get into the routine of doing this after any strenuous exercise session, and see our list of recovery food suggestions.

Have fun.

To make a long-standing commitment to exercise, it’s ideal to actually like to exercise. With so many options to choose from, you don’t need settle for something you aren’t interested in. Find a new activity you’ll be excited about with our list of hot new fitness trends.

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition.